2017/01/19

Missing the Mark Interview

I recently joined author Christopher Lansdown on his Google Hangouts series Missing the Mark. We ended up talking for almost three hours about science fiction, theology, and whatever else struck our fancy.

Chris is quite a knowledgeable fellow, and I'm grateful to have been invited to his show. Check it out.


Bonus: Christopher offers a review of my free short story "Izcacus".
I should begin by saying that I went in knowing that Izcacus was written as an attempt to bridge the gap between religious vampires and scientific vampires. So I didn’t some at it with perfectly fresh eyes, as it were. That will naturally color my thoughts on the story, but probably it has a bigger impact on my reaction to it than my considered thoughts about it.
The first thing I find interesting about Izcacus is that it uses what my friend Michael referred to as epistolary narration. That is, several characters narrate the story in the form of emails, letters, blog posts, journal entries, and most interestingly letters to a dead brother. It’s by no means an unheard of device, but it’s not overly common, and as Michael reminded me, it is also the narrative device in Dracula, by Bram Stoker. I doubt that coincidence is accidental, though I haven’t asked Brian about it. He uses the device well and avoids its weakness—it can easily become very confusing to have multiple narrators—while taking advantage of its strength. In particular, it allows a lot of character development in few words, since the voice of the character tells you a lot about them. Not merely the words they choose or their commentary, but also what they choose to talk about and what they leave out. Editorial decisions tell you as much about a person as creative decisions, if they tell it to you more subtly.
One item I should point out, since Christopher discloses that he's not normally a horror reader, is that I did some pretty extensive research before writing the story. One of my goals was clear away the accretions artificially heaped upon vampire mythology since the 19th century and depict vampires closer to how they were understood in the original folklore. What I found wasn't a clandestine society of suave, neck-biting supermodels. In the old tales, vampirism presents much more like a disease.

Happily, Christopher clearly gets everything else I attempted to do with the story. You can read the rest of the review here.

For more genre-bending thrills, Nethereal, Soul Cycle Book I is the perfect introduction to my long form horror works.



@BrianNiemeier

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